Pushing the Limits of Feasibility

The elastomer parts near the engine or exhaust pipe are the ones most affected by the rising operating temperatures. Over the medium term, new silicone rubber grades even withstand temperatures of up to 300 degrees Celsius.

Though they are quite different, cars and ovens do have a few things in common. For example, they produce heat while in operation – in growing amounts. In response to the downsizing trend, car manufacturers are increasingly employing engines with small cylinder capacity and fewer cylinders. This is compensated by turbocharging and direct injection and leads to higher temperatures under the hood. Manufacturers of household appliances are experiencing growing demand for ovens featuring self-cleaning. During the cleaning cycle, these ovens are heated up to temperatures much higher than those reached during baking.

The higher temperatures mean that the materials must satisfy higher demands on their heat resistance. Rubber-elastic parts must withstand temperatures far exceeding 200 degrees Celsius increasingly often and for increasingly longer periods. Organic rubbers cannot withstand such thermal stress.

In cars, the elastomer parts near the engine or exhaust pipe are the ones most affected by the rising operating temperatures. They can only do their job reliably if they remain permanently elastic under service conditions. Typical components made of elastomer include seals, valve membranes, hoses, bellows and cable jackets.

“With its new ELASTOSIL® R 756 product line, WACKER is responding to the rising demand for elastomer components in applications where the elastomers are repeatedly exposed to very high temperatures for long periods of time.”

Dr. Jürgen Ismeier Marketing Manager, WACKER SILICONES